Worship and Respect

I remember downloading this image from a Catholic website as I thought maybe they had a point.

But then I thought, no they don’t. As if anyone would approach worship in such a manner!
Then I saw this.

I’m with Todd Friel on this.

God help us and forgive us!

Authored by Chris Hall

Advertisements

More Christian Presenters needed on Children’s TV

The BBC have been told to put more Christian presenters on children’s TV to ‘familiarise’ youngsters with different denominations. The study said Christian presenters would ‘validate’ the feelings of Christian children.  It said this was important for young people in their ‘ formative years’.

BBC children’s programmes should include more Catholic, Orthodox and Pentecostal Christians, a report of the corporation recommends. A panel of nine experts said youngsters should be introduced to the diversity of Christian denominations in their early years. While there has been a gradual increased in the representation of these people, they remain ‘still relatively invisible’ in the media, they said.

Demonstrating positive experiences and outcomes will stop Christian children feeling isolated, it said, particularly in rural areas. The report commissioned by the broadcaster, which drew on audience surveys and nine ‘faith experts’, concluded that all genres of programming should regularly feature diverse denominations, with news and drama currently the biggest problem areas.

For dramas and soaps, she recommended bolder storylines featuring Christian characters, while documentaries were deemed to need more Catholic presenters and portrayal of the Orthodox in history. As for comedy, the report concluded that the ‘biggest risk’ was Anglicans being the focus of a joke. This was judged as only truly acceptable when the comedians themselves were Anglican.

Acting director general Tim Davie, chair of the BBC Working Group which commissioned the review, said: ‘The BBC has a fundamental obligation to serve all its audiences. In fact, it’s one of the BBC’s public purposes to reflect the diversity of UK life, especially when 55% of the UK describe themselves as Christian according to the recent census.

Of course the above is a parody of this news item.

But it does make me ask the question as to why someone feels it’s important to have different Christian denominations as Children’s TV presenters? I mean, how do you know if they are Christian, and even if they are what denomination? Are we expected to keep an eye out for how they make the sign of the cross, or whether they genuflect or bow their head?

It’s madness, or as someone else has said:

I don’t want gay presenters, I don’t want straight presenters, I don’t want northern presenters, I don’t want southern presenters, I don’t want black, white, male female, able bodied or disabled presenters. I want competent presenters which seems less and less likely from an increasingly incompetent organisation.

Salvation I

A big subject, so in a number of parts! But why I’m posting is in response to a blog comment that mentioned salvation being brought into play in the life of a person when they had said ‘The Sinner’s Prayer‘ or suchlike. It got me thinking about when salvation begins in the very being of that person, when the future direction of their eternity changes?

So to start with a quick round up of the soteriology or study of salvation from some of the major players in the Christian world!

So let’s start where I started, with the Anglican church and their Thirty-Nine Articles. The XVIII Article is the one that refers to salvation.

XVIII. Of obtaining eternal Salvation only by the Name of Christ.
They also are to be had accursed that presume to say, That every man shall be saved by the Law or Sect which he professeth, so that he be diligent to frame his life according to that Law, and the light of Nature. For Holy Scripture doth set out unto us only the Name of Jesus Christ, whereby men must be saved.

Seems pretty clear – look in the Bible!

Now onto the Catholics.

The doctrine of salvation for the Catholics is defined in the Coucil of Trent. Reading from the Catholic Encycopaedia I think I can sum it up thus:

  • Disposition – you recognise that you need salvation
  • Justification – either by reason of a perfect act of charity elicited by a well disposed sinner or by virtue of the Sacrament either of Baptism or of Penance. 

The Sacrements come into play with infants and those not of sound reason. But quite what this ‘perfect act of charity is I do not know. Anyone?

Now the turn of the Orthodox. And this starts to get complicated for me. According to Orthodox theology salvation is not a stage but a continuous change towards a divine nature or theosis, becoming united with God. So Salvation can be looked upon as three overlapping processes:

  • catharsis (purification)
  • theoria (illumination)
  • theosis (divinization)

So I read that as instead of having a defined point or moment of salvation the Orthodox view is of a continuing theosis, which continues even after death. And if I’m talking cobblers feel free to put me right!

To be continued.